Interpreting A Source Text: A Production Of Trifles ( Common Core ELA 11 - ELA3011 A-CR)

28 August 2022
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question
MRS. PETERS. But I'm awful glad you came with me, Mrs. Hale. It would be lonesome of me sitting here alone. MRS. HALE. It would, wouldn't it? (Dropping her sewing). But I tell you what I do wish, Mrs. Peters. I wish I had come over sometimes she was here. Iβ€” (Looking around the room.)β€”wish I had. How would a film version most likely emphasize the women's emotions during this scene?
answer
by focusing on the women's facial expressions
question
SHERIFF. Well, can you beat the women! Held for murder and worryin' about her preserves. COUNTY ATTORNEY. I guess before we're through she may have something more serious than preserves to worry about. In a film production, where should the camera focus if the director wants to emphasize the men's emotions?
answer
on close-ups of the men
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What is one advantage of silently reading a play as opposed to listening to an audio recording?
answer
Readers can imagine the sound and tone of each character's voice.
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What is true about both the stage and film version of a drama?
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Both require the viewer to infer characters' emotions and motivations through the actors' portrayals.
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MRS. HALE (stiffly). There's a great deal of work to be done on a farm. COUNTY ATTORNEY. To be sure. And yet . . . (With a little bow to her.) . . . I know there are some Dickson county farmhouses which do not have such roller towels. (He gives it a pull to expose its full length again.) What is one possible disadvantage of hearing the characters' voices as opposed to silently reading the scene?
answer
It does not allow listeners to review or reread what each character has said.
question
MRS. HALE (stiffly). There's a great deal of work to be done on a farm. What is one possible disadvantage of hearing the characters' voices as opposed to silently reading the scene?
answer
Readers are unable to create their own voices for how the county attorney and Mrs. Hale might sound.
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How are stage and film versions of a drama similar?
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The viewer must infer the mood from the lighting and sound effects.
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SHERIFF. I suppose anything Mrs. Peters does'll be all right. She was to take in some clothes for her, you know, and a few little things. We left in such a hurry yesterday. COUNTY ATTORNEY. Yes, but I would like to see what you take, Mrs. Peters, and keep an eye out for anything that might be of use to us. What is one possible advantage of hearing the characters' voices as opposed to silently reading the scene?
answer
Hearing allows listeners to associate a voice with each of the characters.
question
MRS. HALE. Duty's all right, but I guess that deputy sheriff that came out to make the fire might have got a little of this on. (Gives the roller towel a pull.) Wish I'd thought of that sooner. Seems mean to talk about her for not having things slicked up when she had to come away in such a hurry. MRS. PETERS. (who has gone to a small table in the left rear corner of the room, and lifted on end of a towel that covers a pan). She had bread set. (Stands still.) How would an audio recording of this excerpt help establish the setting of the play?
answer
through the sound effect of footsteps around the kitchen
question
(The County Attorney, after again looking around the kitchen, opens the door of a cupboard closet. He gets up on a chair and looks on a shelf. Pulls his hand away, sticky.) COUNTY ATTORNEY. Here's a nice mess. (The women draw nearer.) MRS. PETERS (to the other woman). Oh, her fruit; it did freeze. (To the Lawyer). She worried about that when it turned so cold. She said the fire'd go out and her jars would break. SHERIFF. Well, can you beat the women! Held for murder and worryin' about her preserves. What would be one advantage of reading this scene as opposed to watching or listening to it?
answer
Readers can creatively interpret and visualize stage directions in their minds.