Management 455 Chapter 7

25 July 2022
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question
The reason the world economy is globalizing at an accelerated pace is because: A. countries previously open to foreign companies have closed their markets. B. countries that previously had market or mixed economies now embrace planned economies. C. information technology expands the importance of geographic distance. D. growth-minded companies are racing to build stronger competitive positions in the markets of more countries. E. countries opposed to market or mixed economies have stringent trade barriers in place.
answer
D. growth-minded companies are racing to build stronger competitive positions in the markets of more countries.
question
The reasons why a company opts to expand outside its home market include all of the following EXCEPT: A. gaining access to new customers for the company's products/services. B. spreading its business risk across a wider market base. C. achieving lower costs through economies of scale, experience, and increased purchasing power. D. exploiting its core competencies and capabilities. E. identifying resources and capabilities in the company's home market.
answer
E. identifying resources and capabilities in the company's home market.
question
Exxon Mobil enters into a pact with Gazprom, the world's largest natural gas extractor, to set up a processing unit in Moscow. Which of the following is most likely the reason for Exxon Mobil to opt for this strategic alliance? A. To gain access to new customers B. To scale back its core competencies C. To restrict its factors of production D. To gain access to low-cost inputs of production E. To better compete with Gasprom
answer
D. To gain access to low-cost inputs of production
question
Why do companies decide to enter a foreign market? A. To capture economies of scale in product development, manufacturing, or marketing B. To raise input costs through greater pooled purchasing power C. To decrease the rate at which they accumulate experience and move up the learning curve D. To concentrate risk within a broader base of countries, especially when sales are down in one area and the company can undermine sales elsewhere E. To exploit the natural resources found within its home market
answer
A. To capture economies of scale in product development, manufacturing, or marketing
question
Which of the following is NOT a reason why a company decides to enter foreign markets? A. To spread business risk across a wider geographic market base B. To capitalize on company competencies and capabilities C. To achieve lower costs through economies of scale, experience, and increased purchasing power D. To impart technical knowledge to high-cost human resources in developing nations E. To gain access to more buyers for the company's products/services
answer
D. To impart technical knowledge to high-cost human resources in developing nations
question
Which of the following is NOT a reason why crafting a strategy to compete in one or more foreign markets is inherently complex? A. Because factors that affect industry competitiveness vary from country to country B. Because of the potential for location-based advantages to conducting value chain activities in certain countries C. Because different government policies and economic conditions make the business climate more favorable in some countries than others D. Because of the risks for shifts in currency exchange rates E. Because similarities in buyer tastes and preferences facilitate standardization of products and services
answer
E. Because similarities in buyer tastes and preferences facilitate standardization of products and services
question
Which of the following is NOT an accurate statement as concerns competing in the markets of foreign countries? A. Localizing a global company's product offerings country-by-country leads to low-cost advantage. B. There are country-to-country differences in consumer buying habits and buyer tastes and preferences. C. A company must contend with fluctuating exchange rates and country-to-country variations in host government restrictions and requirements. D. Product designs suitable for one country are often inappropriate in another. E. Market growth rates vary from country to country.
answer
A. Localizing a global company's product offerings country-by-country leads to low-cost advantage.
question
The diamond framework is NOT LIKELY to answer which of the following questions about competing on an international basis? A. Where will the foreign entrants come from? B. Which countries have the weakest foreign rivals? C. What are the attributes of a country's business environment? D. What location of value chain activities is most beneficial? E. What are the disadvantages of allowing foreign competition?
answer
E. What are the disadvantages of allowing foreign competition?
question
Competing in the markets of foreign countries generally does NOT involve which of the following? A. Country-to-country differences in consumer buying habits and buyer tastes and preferences B. Country-to-country variations in host government restrictions and requirements and fluctuating exchange rates C. Whether to customize the company's offerings in each different country market or whether to offer a mostly standardized product worldwide D. In which countries to locate company operations for maximum locational advantage, given country-to-country variations in wage rates, worker productivity, energy costs, tax rates, and the like E. Crafting a multidomestic strategy that works just as well in one country as in another and that also has the appeal of turning the world market into a mostly homogeneous market
answer
E. Crafting a multidomestic strategy that works just as well in one country as in another and that also has the appeal of turning the world market into a mostly homogeneous market
question
One of the biggest strategic challenges to competing in the international arena includes: A. how to leverage the opportunities arising from shifting exchange rates. B. how to charge the same price in all country markets. C. how to identify foreign firms licensed to produce and distribute the company's products. D. whether to offer a standardized product worldwide or a customized product offering in each different country market. E. whether to pursue a franchising strategy or a joint venture strategy.
answer
D. whether to offer a standardized product worldwide or a customized product offering in each different country market.
question
What aspect of the diamond framework is MOST LIKELY responsible for GlenmarkPharma setting up manufacturing facilities in the United States, the world's largest market for pharmaceuticals? A. Licensing strategies B. Demand conditions C. Joint venture strategies D. Franchising strategies E. Firm strategy, structure, and rivalry
answer
B. Demand conditions
question
Which of the following is NOT a factor analyzed and relied on by firms when developing competitive strength in a foreign market? A. The relative size of the market, its growth potential, and the nature of domestic buyers' needs and wants B. The availability, quality, and cost of raw materials and other inputs that firms will require to produce their products and services C. The development of different styles of management, organization, and strategy D. The degree of collaboration with key suppliers and the greater the knowledge sharing throughout the related-industry cluster E. The level of industry-related support activities to foster customization of products and services
answer
E. The level of industry-related support activities to foster customization of products and services
question
Which of the following exemplifies location-based advantage for the companies competing on an international basis? A. Microsemi Corporation acquires California based Actel Corporation. B. RBC Wealth Management closes operations in South Florida. C. Samsung diversifies and ventures into textiles and food processing. D. Hyundai signs a memorandum of understanding with the government of South Korea to halt exports. E. De Beers sets up operations in the mining region of South Africa.
answer
E. De Beers sets up operations in the mining region of South Africa.
question
The diamond framework can be used to reveal the answers to all of the following that are important for competing on an international basis EXCEPT: A. where foreign entrants into an industry are most likely to come from. B. how to formulate an exit strategy to push foreign competitors out of the market. C. which countries' foreign rivals are likely to be the weakest. D. how managers can decide which foreign markets to enter first. E. where to locate different value chain activities so they are the most beneficial.
answer
B. how to formulate an exit strategy to push foreign competitors out of the market.
question
Apollo Tires sets up a manufacturing unit in Mexico. Following this, Renault-Nissan signs a supply contract with the tire multinational. In which of the following ways is Renault-Nissan likely to gain from the pact? A. Different styles of management, organization, and strategy B. Knowledge sharing within same value chain system C. Availability of natural resources at low cost D. Growth potential and large size of the market E. Government policies in the host country
answer
B. Knowledge sharing within same value chain system
question
Which of the following is LIKELY to be viewed as a pro-business government policy from the perspective of companies competing on an international basis? A. Argentina increases its interest rate on loans to foreign entrants from 15% to 19%. B. The European Union imposes a 16% tariff on the import of agricultural produce. C. Australia introduces a permanent employer-sponsored visa program for skilled manpower. D. Denmark levies a per metric ton carbon tax on electricity. E. The Chinese government favors partial local ownership of foreign-owned companies.
answer
C. Australia introduces a permanent employer-sponsored visa program for skilled manpower.
question
Which of the following is NOT a typical host government requirement that affects the operations of foreign companies? A. Establishing local content requirement on goods made inside their borders by foreign companies B. Having rules and policies that protect local companies from foreign competition C. Placing restrictions on exports to ensure adequate local supplies D. Requiring foreign companies to use vertical integration to support operations of local companies E. Imposing burdensome tax structures and regulatory requirements upon foreign companies doing business within their borders
answer
D. Requiring foreign companies to use vertical integration to support operations of local companies
question
The difference between political risks and economic risks is that: A. political risks stem from instability or weakness in national governments, while economic risks stem from the stability of a country's monetary system, and its economic and regulatory policies. B. political risks stem from stability in foreign business, while economic risks stem from an excess of property right protections. C. political risks stem from hostility to foreign currencies, while economic risks stem from the instability of the monetary system. D. political risks stem from exchange rate fluctuations, while economic risks stem from hostility to foreign business. E. political risks stem from the stability of a country's monetary system, while economic risks stem from instability in national business.
answer
A. political risks stem from instability or weakness in national governments, while economic risks stem from the stability of a country's monetary system, and its economic and regulatory policies.
question
A U.S. manufacturer that exports goods made at its U.S. plants for shipment to foreign markets: A. is competitively disadvantaged when the U.S. dollar declines in value against the currencies of the countries to which it is exporting. B. is largely unaffected by fluctuating exchange rates. It would, however, be affected if its plants were in foreign countries. C. becomes more competitive in foreign markets when the U.S. dollar gains in value against the currencies of the countries to which it is exporting. D. becomes more competitive in foreign markets when the U.S. dollar declines in value against the currencies of the countries to which it is exporting. E. has no interest in whether the dollar grows stronger or weaker versus foreign currencies unless it is competing only against companies located in foreign countries.
answer
D. becomes more competitive in foreign markets when the U.S. dollar declines in value against the currencies of the countries to which it is exporting.
question
A European manufacturer that exports goods made at its European plants to the United States: A. is competitively disadvantaged when the euro declines in value against the U.S. dollar. B. is largely unaffected by fluctuating exchange rates between the euro and the U.S. dollar. It would, however, be affected if its plants were in the U.S. C. becomes more competitive in the U.S. market when the euro declines in value against the U.S. dollar. D. becomes more competitive in European markets when the euro declines in value against the U.S. dollar. E. has no interest in whether the euro grows stronger or weaker versus the U.S. dollar unless its chief competitors are other companies located in countries whose currency is also the euro.
answer
C. becomes more competitive in the U.S. market when the euro declines in value against the U.S. dollar.
question
A U.S. company that makes all of its goods at a plant in Brazil and then exports the Brazilian-made goods to country markets across the world: A. is competitively disadvantaged when the U.S. dollar declines in value against the Brazilian real. B. is competitively advantaged when the Brazilian real declines in value against the currencies of the countries to which the Brazilian-made goods are being exported. C. becomes less competitive in foreign markets when the Brazilian real declines in value against the currencies of the countries to which the Brazilian-made goods are being exported. D. is competitively advantaged when the U.S. dollar appreciates in value against the Brazilian real. E. is unaffected by changes in the valuation of foreign currencies against the Brazilian real—all that matters to a U.S. company is the valuation of the U.S. dollar against the Brazilian real.
answer
B. is competitively advantaged when the Brazilian real declines in value against the currencies of the countries to which the Brazilian-made goods are being exported.
question
A European-based company that makes all of its goods at a plant in Brazil and then exports the Brazilian-made goods to country markets in many different parts of the world: A. is competitively disadvantaged when the euro declines in value against the Brazilian real. B. is competitively disadvantaged when the Brazilian real declines in value against the currencies of the countries to which the Brazilian-made goods are being exported. C. becomes less competitive in foreign markets when the Brazilian real gains in value against the currencies of the countries to which the Brazilian-made goods are being exported. D. is competitively advantaged when the euro appreciates in value against the Brazilian real. E. has no interest in whether the euro grows stronger or weaker versus the Brazilian real unless its chief competitors are other companies located in countries whose currency is also the euro.
answer
C. becomes less competitive in foreign markets when the Brazilian real gains in value against the currencies of the countries to which the Brazilian-made goods are being exported.
question
Why does a U.S. company exporting wooden furniture manufactured in Malaysia to the European Union benefit from the decline in the value of ringgit against the euro? A. Because decline in the value of ringgit against euro raises the cost of furniture manufactured in Malaysia, making it less competitive in European markets B. Because decline in the value of ringgit against euro reduces the cost of furniture manufactured in Malaysia, making it more competitive in European markets C. Because decline in the value of ringgit against euro has no impact on the cost of furniture manufactured in Malaysia, both in Malaysian or European markets D. Because decline in the value of ringgit against euro makes European goods more competitive as compared to Malaysian goods E. Because decline in the value of ringgit against euro makes Malaysian goods less competitive in the U.S. market
answer
B. Because decline in the value of ringgit against euro reduces the cost of furniture manufactured in Malaysia, making it more competitive in European markets
question
The advantages of manufacturing goods in a particular country and exporting them to foreign markets: A. are largely unaffected by fluctuating exchange rates. B. are greatest when local distributors and dealers in that country can be convinced not to carry products that are made outside the country's borders. C. can be wiped out when that country's currency grows weaker relative to the currencies of the countries where the output is being sold. D. are weakened when that country's currency grows stronger relative to the currencies of the countries where the output is being sold. E. are multiplied by the potential for local government officials to raise tariffs on the imports of foreign-made goods into their country.
answer
D. are weakened when that country's currency grows stronger relative to the currencies of the countries where the output is being sold.
question
Which of the following statements concerning the effects of fluctuating exchange rates on companies competing in foreign markets is NOT accurate? A. Fluctuating exchange rates pose significant risks to a company's competitiveness in foreign markets. B. The advantages of manufacturing goods in a particular country are largely unaffected by fluctuating exchange rates. C. Exporters win when the currency of the country from which the goods are being exported grows weaker relative to the currencies of the countries that the goods are being exported to. D. The advantages of manufacturing goods in a particular country can be undermined when that country's currency grows stronger relative to the currencies of the countries where the output is being sold. E. Domestic companies under pressure from lower-cost imports are benefited when their government's currency grows weaker in relation to the currencies of the countries where the imported goods are being made.
answer
B. The advantages of manufacturing goods in a particular country are largely unaffected by fluctuating exchange rates.
question
Which of the following statements concerning the effects of fluctuating exchange rates on companies competing in foreign markets is true? A. Fluctuating exchange rates do not pose significant risks to a company's competitiveness in foreign markets. B. The advantages of manufacturing goods in a particular country are largely unaffected by fluctuating exchange rates. C. Companies that are manufacturing goods in a particular country and are exporting much of what they produce are disadvantaged when that country's currency grows weaker relative to the currencies of the countries that the goods are being exported to. D. Companies that are manufacturing goods in a particular country and are exporting much of what they produce are benefited when that country's currency grows weaker relative to the currencies of the countries that the goods are being exported to. E. Domestic companies under pressure from lower-cost imports are hurt even more when their government's currency grows weaker in relation to the currencies of the countries where the imported goods are being made.
answer
D. Companies that are manufacturing goods in a particular country and are exporting much of what they produce are benefited when that country's currency grows weaker relative to the currencies of the countries that the goods are being exported to.
question
Which of the following statements about fluctuating exchange rates and the related effects on companies competing in foreign markets is true? A. Fluctuating exchange rates pose significant risks to a company's competitiveness in foreign markets. B. The advantages of manufacturing goods in a particular country are largely unaffected by fluctuating exchange rates. C. Companies that are manufacturing goods in a particular country and are exporting much of what they produce lose out when that country's currency grows weaker relative to the currencies of the countries that the goods are being exported to. D. The advantages of manufacturing goods in a particular country improve when that country's currency grows stronger relative to the currencies of the countries where the output is being sold. E. Domestic companies under pressure from lower-cost imports are hurt even more when their government's currency grows weaker in relation to the currencies of the countries where the imported goods are being made.
answer
A. Fluctuating exchange rates pose significant risks to a company's competitiveness in foreign markets.
question
A weaker U.S. dollar is an economically favorable exchange-rate shift for manufacturing plants based in the United States. A. This is a true statement. B. No, the U.S. dollar must be stronger. C. Yes, because it provides for a weakened foreign demand for U.S.-made goods. D. Yes, because it makes such plants less cost competitive with foreign plants. E. Yes, because it provides incentives of foreign companies to locate manufacturing facilities in the U.S. to make goods for U.S. consumers.
answer
A. This is a true statement.
question
Which of the following exemplifies cross-country differences in demographic, cultural, and market conditions? A. Nike produces its own line of skate shoes. B. Starbucks acquires a large coffee farm in Costa Rica. C. Ireland provides low-costs loans to foreign entrants to stimulate capital investment. D. Intel's silicon chips are identical across the world. E. McDonald's offers 100% beef-free products in its outlets in India.
answer
E. McDonald's offers 100% beef-free products in its outlets in India.
question
Companies operating in an international marketplace have to respond to all of the following, EXCEPT: A. whether to customize their offerings in each different country market to match the tastes and preferences of local buyers. B. whether to pursue a strategy of offering a mostly standardized product worldwide. C. how much to customize their offerings in each different country market to match the tastes and preferences of local buyers. D. the tensions between market pressures to localize a company's product offerings country by country and the competitive pressures to lower costs through greater product customization. E. whether to buy a struggling competitor at a bargain price or pay a premium to gain entry to the local market.
answer
E. whether to buy a struggling competitor at a bargain price or pay a premium to gain entry to the local market.
question
Which of the following factors does NOT determine whether to employ entry strategy options? A. Cross-border transfer activities and home country advantages B. The nature of the firm's objectives C. Whether the firm has a full range of resources and capabilities needed to operate abroad D. Country-specific factors such as trade barriers E. Transaction costs involved (the cost of contracting with a partner and monitoring compliance with the terms of the contract)
answer
A. Cross-border transfer activities and home country advantages
question
Using domestic plants as a production base for exporting goods to selected foreign country markets: A. can be an excellent initial strategy to test the international waters and learn if attractive market positions can be established in foreign markets. B. can be a competitively successful strategy when a company is focusing on vacant market niches in each foreign country and does not have to compete head-to-head against strong host country competitors. C. can be a powerful strategy since a company can maintain a one-country production base allowing it to capitalize on company competencies and capabilities. D. can be a weak strategy when competitors are pursuing multi-country strategies. E. can be a powerful strategy because a company is not vulnerable to fluctuating exchange rates.
answer
A. can be an excellent initial strategy to test the international waters and learn if attractive market positions can be established in foreign markets.
question
Which of the following is an example of an export strategy? A. The popular Disney character Mickey Mouse can only be leased or rented for use by companies. B. Subway allows small-business owners to use its trademarks, services, and products for a fee. C. The Unites States is the world's largest producer and supplier of artificial fur. D. American Airlines' common stock, owned by AMR Corp., is not available for public purchase. E. Walmart earns a quarter of its revenue outside the United States.
answer
C. The Unites States is the world's largest producer and supplier of artificial fur.
question
The advantages of using a licensing strategy to participate in foreign markets include: A. being especially well-suited to achieve scale economies. B. being able to charge lower prices than rivals. C. being able to achieve first-mover advantages quickly and easily. D. being able to leverage the company's technical know-how, appealing brand, or patents without committing their resources or capabilities to foreign markets. E. being able to achieve higher product quality and better product performance than with an export strategy.
answer
D. being able to leverage the company's technical know-how, appealing brand, or patents without committing their resources or capabilities to foreign markets.
question
The advantages of using a franchising strategy to pursue opportunities in foreign markets include: A. having franchisees bear most of the costs and risks of establishing foreign locations and requiring the franchisor to expend only the resources to recruit, train, and support and monitor franchisees. B. being particularly well-suited to the global expansion efforts of companies with multidomestic strategies. C. allowing a company to achieve scale economies. D. being well suited to companies who employ cross-border transfer strategies. E. being well suited to the global expansion efforts of manufacturers.
answer
A. having franchisees bear most of the costs and risks of establishing foreign locations and requiring the franchisor to expend only the resources to recruit, train, and support and monitor franchisees.
question
The big problem a franchisor faces is: A. allowing franchisees to achieve scale economies. B. maintaining quality control due to a lack of commitment to consistency and standardization. C. eliminating the costs and risks associated with establishing a foreign business location. D. sharing foreign facilities and marketing strategies with local businesses. E. achieving higher product quality and better product performance than with an export strategy.
answer
B. maintaining quality control due to a lack of commitment to consistency and standardization.
question
The advantages of using an acquisition strategy to pursue opportunities in foreign markets include: A. having a high level of control and speed as an entry strategy to overcome trade barriers. B. allowing a company to achieve scalable economies. C. eliminating the costs and risks associated with establishing a foreign business location. D. achieving variable product quality and competitive product performance. E. exporting goods at higher costs than rivals in those locations.
answer
A. having a high level of control and speed as an entry strategy to overcome trade barriers.
question
The big issue an acquisition-minded firm must consider is whether: A. to acquire the firm at a price that cannot recapture the investment. B. to require the acquired firm's resources and management capability to sustain the ongoing struggling operation. C. to pay a premium price for a successful local company or to buy a struggling firm at a discount price. D. to pay a price that builds in all the synergistic advantages to the acquired firm. E. to pay a very high premium price that sends a signal to the market that the new firm has arrived.
answer
C. to pay a premium price for a successful local company or to buy a struggling firm at a discount price.
question
A greenfield venture in a foreign market is one: A. where the company creates a wholly owned subsidiary business by setting up all aspects of the operation upon entering the market from the ground up. B. where foreign facilities and marketing strategies are shared with local businesses. C. where the company learns through training by the foreign entity on how to compete. D. that supports exports into a foreign market by marketing indirectly thru local rivals. E. that offers lower risk and a faster path to financial returns.
answer
A. where the company creates a wholly owned subsidiary business by setting up all aspects of the operation upon entering the market from the ground up.
question
Greenfield ventures, like all market entry strategies can pose serious problems to achieving foreign market entry success. What is NOT deemed a barrier to success? A. Such ventures can require costly capital investments. B. Such ventures can have a tendency to divert valuable resources from current business. C. Such ventures really need well-functioning strong markets. D. Such ventures are the fastest entry route to achieve a sizeable market share. E. Such ventures require legal protections of foreign investors.
answer
D. Such ventures are the fastest entry route to achieve a sizeable market share.
question
Which of the following is a condition that makes an internal startup strategy appealing over an acquisition? A. When an internal startup is more costly. B. When an internal startup affects the supply-demand balance by increasing production capacity C. When an internal startup is unable to gain distribution access advantages D. When an internal startup has the necessary scale and resource strengths to compete with rivals E. When an internal startup lacks the experience in establishing new subsidiaries
answer
D. When an internal startup has the necessary scale and resource strengths to compete with rivals
question
Which of the following is NOT an advantage of strategic alliances, joint ventures, and cooperative agreements between domestic and foreign firms? A. Competing on a more global scale while still preserving their independence B. Gaining better access to scale economies in production and/or marketing C. Filling competitively important gaps in their technical expertise and/or knowledge of local markets D. Sharing distribution facilities and dealer networks, thus mutually strengthening their access to buyers E. Creating permanent arrangements between the domestic and foreign firms
answer
E. Creating permanent arrangements between the domestic and foreign firms
question
Which of the following is an example of a cross-border alliance? A. Facebook took over WhatsApp for $19 billion in February 2014. B. Hyundai Motor Company plans to open a new manufacturing plant in the Czech Republic. C. The insurance company Geicois a wholly owned subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway. D. Renault-Nissan sells more than one in ten cars worldwide. E. Carrefour, a French grocery chain, established a new wholly-owned venture in Poland.
answer
D. Renault-Nissan sells more than one in ten cars worldwide.
question
Which of the following is NOT a risk of cross-border alliances between domestic and foreign firms? A. Overcoming language and cultural barriers B. Launching new initiatives to stay abreast of shifting market conditions C. Developing mutually agreeable ways of dealing with key issues or differences D. Disengaging from the alliance once its purpose has been served E. Becoming overly dependent on foreign partners for essential expertise
answer
D. Disengaging from the alliance once its purpose has been served
question
The risks of strategic alliances often include all of the following EXCEPT: A. conflicting objectives and strategies. B. deep differences of opinion about how to proceed operationally and strategically. C. important differences in corporate values. D. misunderstandings about appropriate ethical standards. E. potential for royalty from trustworthy firms.
answer
E. potential for royalty from trustworthy firms.
question
What is the foremost strategic issue that must be addressed by firms when operating in two or more foreign markets? A. Deciding on the degree to vary its competitive approach to fit the specific market conditions and buyer preferences in each host country B. Deciding on the appropriate level of sustainable profitability C. Deciding on the relative cost competitiveness of the home country D. Deciding on the degree of globalization to maintain expansion capabilities E. Deciding on the resources and capabilities of allies
answer
A. Deciding on the degree to vary its competitive approach to fit the specific market conditions and buyer preferences in each host country
question
Which of the following is NOT one of the strategy options for competing in the markets of foreign countries? A. A profit sanctuary strategy B. An international strategy C. A global strategy. D. A multidomestic strategy E. A transnational strategy
answer
A. A profit sanctuary strategy
question
Which of the following statements regarding multidomestic competition is false? A. Buyers in different countries are attracted to different product attributes. B. The benefits from global integration and standardization are high. C. Industry conditions and competitive forces in each national market differ in important respects. D. The mix of competitors in each country market varies from country to country. E. Winning in one country market does not necessarily signal the ability to fare well in other countries.
answer
B. The benefits from global integration and standardization are high.
question
Which of the following strategies identifies a multidomestic approach? A. Texas Instruments strongly encourages its trading partners to use the UN/EDIFACT standard. B. Hard Rock Cafes in Hawaii offer fish tacos and ahi tuna sandwich. C. Coca Cola's general market approach is controlled from Atlanta. D. Nestle established its own distribution network in China. E. Air Asia adapts its price to industry pressures.
answer
B. Hard Rock Cafes in Hawaii offer fish tacos and ahi tuna sandwich.
question
When is a think-local, act-local approach to strategy making appropriate? A. When the need for local responsiveness is minimal and when potential efficiency gains from standardization is unrestricted by cross-country opportunities B. When the local manager is intellectually savvy C. When the local market provides strong opportunity for growth and profitability D. When the need for local responsiveness is high due to significant cross-country differences in demographic, cultural, and market conditions and where benefits from standardization is limited E. When the need for centralized decision making is relevant due to various macroeconomic and market conditions
answer
D. When the need for local responsiveness is high due to significant cross-country differences in demographic, cultural, and market conditions and where benefits from standardization is limited
question
Which of the following statements regarding global competition is false? A. In global competition, rivals vie for worldwide market leadership. B. In globally competitive industries, the power and strength of a company's strategy and resource capabilities in one country significantly enhance its competitiveness in other country markets. C. In global competition, a firm's overall competitive advantage (or disadvantage) grows out of its entire worldwide operations. D. In global competition, there's more cross-country variation in industry conditions and competitive forces than there is in industries where multidomestic competition prevails. E. In global competition, many of the same rival companies compete against each other in many different countries, but especially so in countries where sales volumes are large and where having a competitive presence is strategically important to building a strong global position in the industry.
answer
D. In global competition, there's more cross-country variation in industry conditions and competitive forces than there is in industries where multidomestic competition prevails.
question
Which of the following statements regarding multidomestic and global competition is false? A. In global competition, rivals vie for worldwide market leadership and the leading competitors compete head-to-head in the markets of many different countries. B. In globally competitive industries, a company's competitive position in one country both affects and is affected by its position in other countries. C. In multidomestic competition, there is greater cross-country variation in market conditions and the nature of the competitive contest among rivals than tends to be the case in globally competitive markets. D. With multidomestic competition, the competitive contest is localized, with rivals battling for national market leadership; moreover, winning in one country market does not necessarily signal that a company has the ability to fare well in the markets of other countries. E. In global competition, the size of a firm's worldwide competitive advantage (or disadvantage) equals the sum of the competitive advantages (or disadvantages) it has in each country market where it competes.
answer
E. In global competition, the size of a firm's worldwide competitive advantage (or disadvantage) equals the sum of the competitive advantages (or disadvantages) it has in each country market where it competes.
question
Which of the following is the most unlikely element of a localized multidomestic strategy? A. Granting country managers fairly wide strategy-making latitude B. Scattering plants across many host countries, each producing product versions for local area markets C. Adapting marketing and distribution to the buying habits, customs, and culture of each host country D. Considering the preference for local suppliers (use of some local suppliers may be mandated by host governments) E. Selling directly to buyers (perhaps via the company's website) to avoid having to establish networks of wholesale/retail dealers in each country market
answer
E. Selling directly to buyers (perhaps via the company's website) to avoid having to establish networks of wholesale/retail dealers in each country market
question
A "think local, act local" multidomestic type of strategy: A. is very risky, given fluctuating exchange rates and the propensity of foreign governments to impose tariffs on imported goods. B. is usually defeated by a "think global, act global" type of strategy. C. is more appealing when the country-to-country differences in buyer tastes, cultural traditions, and market conditions are diverse. D. is generally an inferior strategy when one or more foreign competitors are pursuing a global low-cost strategy. E. can defeat a global strategy if the "think local, act local" multicountry strategist concentrates its efforts exclusively in those foreign markets which have superior resources.
answer
C. is more appealing when the country-to-country differences in buyer tastes, cultural traditions, and market conditions are diverse.
question
The strength of a "think local, act local" multidomestic strategy is that: A. it matches a company's competitive approach to prevailing market and competitive conditions in each country market, country by country. B. it employs strategies that are almost totally different from and also unrelated to its strategies in other countries. C. it operates independent plants, located in different countries, thus promoting greater achievement of scale economies. D. it avoids host country ownership requirements and import quotas. E. it eliminates the costs and burdens of trying to coordinate the strategic moves undertaken in one country with the moves undertaken in the other countries.
answer
A. it matches a company's competitive approach to prevailing market and competitive conditions in each country market, country by country.
question
A "think local, act local" multidomestic strategy works particularly well in all of the following situations, EXCEPT when there are: A. regulations enacted by the host governments requiring that products sold locally meet strictly defined manufacturing specifications or performance standards. B. significant country-to-country differences in customer preferences and buying habits. C. diverse and complicated trade restrictions of host governments preclude the use of a uniform strategy from country-to-country. D. significant country-to-country differences in distribution channels and marketing methods. E. large demands to pursue conflicting objectives simultaneously.
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E. large demands to pursue conflicting objectives simultaneously.
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A "think-local, act local" multidomestic strategy entails: A. offering a narrow product line aimed at serving buyers in the same segments of country markets worldwide. B. giving local managers considerable strategy-making latitude and often producing different product versions for different countries. C. adopting aggressive efforts to locate facilities in those country markets that have superior resources. D. pursuing strong product differentiation and competing in many buyer segments. E. extensive efforts to transfer a company's competencies and resource strengths from one country to another so as to keep entry costs into new country markets low.
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B. giving local managers considerable strategy-making latitude and often producing different product versions for different countries.
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In which of the following situations is employing a "think local, act local" multidomestic strategy highly questionable? A. When a company desires to transfer competencies and resources across country boundaries and is striving to build a single, uniform competitive advantage worldwide B. When there are significant country-to-country differences in customer preferences and buying habits industry is characterized by big economies of scale and strong experience curve effects C. When the trade restrictions of host governments are diverse and complicated D. When there are significant country-to-country differences in distribution channels and marketing methods E. When host governments enact regulations requiring that products sold locally meet strictly defined manufacturing specifications or performance standards
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A. When a company desires to transfer competencies and resources across country boundaries and is striving to build a single, uniform competitive advantage worldwide
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What is a primary drawback of a localized multidomestic strategy? A. It hinders the use of cross-border coordination of a company's activities and increases a company's vulnerability to adverse shifts in currency exchange rates. B. It makes it very difficult to take into account significant country-to-country differences in distribution channels and marketing methods. C. It makes it difficult and costly to be responsive to country-to-country differences in customer needs, buying habits, cultural traditions, and market conditions. D. It hinders the transfer of a company's competencies and resources across country boundaries and hinders the pursuit of a single, uniform competitive advantage in all country markets where a company operates. E. It is unsuitable for competing in the markets of emerging countries and posing added difficulty in modifying a company's business model to compete on the basis of low price.
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D. It hinders the transfer of a company's competencies and resources across country boundaries and hinders the pursuit of a single, uniform competitive advantage in all country markets where a company operates.
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A global strategy allows for: A. the leading companies to compete for the biggest share of the world market, but only occasionally compete head-to-head in different countries. B. the markets in various countries to be part of the world market and competitive conditions across country markets to be strongly linked. C. a company's overall market strength to be the sum of its market shares in each country market where it has a presence. D. the industry leaders to be foreign companies, while domestic companies are relegated to runner-up status. E. a firm's overall competitive advantage to be determined by the size of the competitive advantage it has in each of its profit sanctuaries.
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B. the markets in various countries to be part of the world market and competitive conditions across country markets to be strongly linked.
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A global strategy is one in which a company performs all of the following tasks, EXCEPT: A. employs the same basic competitive approach in all countries where it operates. B. sells much of the same products everywhere. C. strives to build global brands. D. coordinates its actions worldwide with strong headquarters control represents a think-global, act-global approach. E. uses local brand names to cater to a country's specific needs.
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E. uses local brand names to cater to a country's specific needs.
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A think-global, act-global strategic theme puts emphasis on: A. executing a global domination strategy that focuses the company's resource strengths on entry strategies across all country boundaries. B. ensuring that value chain activities are defined by country-specific attributes to capitalize on economies of scale. C. building a global brand name and aggressively pursuing opportunities to transfer ideas, products, and capabilities from one country to another. D. elevating resources and capabilities developed on a country-by-country basis so as to capitalize on a country's uniqueness. E. implementing mass-customization techniques that can address local preferences efficiently.
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C. building a global brand name and aggressively pursuing opportunities to transfer ideas, products, and capabilities from one country to another.
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What is the best way to achieve the efficiency potential of a global strategy? A. It demands managerial attention to be focused on objective-setting specifically oriented toward production practices. B. It requires that resources and best practices be shared, value chain activities be integrated, and capabilities be transferred from one location to another as they are developed. C. It requires that the best identified resources and capabilities be centralized at headquarters. D. It requires value chain activities to be dispersed across many countries to elevate cost control management as a primary focus in all countries. E. It requires giving local managers considerable latitude for executing strategies for the country markets they are responsible for.
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B. It requires that resources and best practices be shared, value chain activities be integrated, and capabilities be transferred from one location to another as they are developed.
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During the 1980s, the YKK Group developed and manufactured all its fastening products within Japan. Which of the following aspects of the global strategy was YKK trying to achieve? A. YKK catered to homogenous buyer needs across countries and regions. B. YKK centralized its value chain thereby facilitating centralized control. C. YKK engaged in higher levels of R&D by spreading risks over higher-volume output. D. YKK sold the same products under the same brand name everywhere. E. YKK established a single plant to produce different versions of the same product.
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B. YKK centralized its value chain thereby facilitating centralized control.
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Which of the following does NOT accurately characterize the differences between a localized multidomestic strategy and a global strategy? A. A global strategy entails extensive strategy coordination across countries and a multidomestic strategy entails little or no strategy coordination across countries. B. A global strategy often entails use of the best suppliers from anywhere in the world, whereas a multidomestic strategy may entail fairly extensive use of local suppliers (especially where use of local sources is required by host governments). C. A global strategy tends to involve use of similar distribution and marketing approaches worldwide, whereas a multidomestic strategy often entails adapting distribution and marketing to local customs and the culture of each country. D. A global strategy involves striving to be the global low-cost provider by economically producing and marketing a mostly standardized product worldwide, whereas a multidomestic strategy entails pursuing broad differentiation and striving to strongly differentiate its products in one country from the products it sells in other countries. E. A global strategy relies upon the same technologies, competencies, and capabilities worldwide, whereas a multidomestic strategy often entails the use of somewhat different technologies, competencies, and capabilities as may be needed to accommodate local buyer tastes, cultural traditions, and market conditions.
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D. A global strategy involves striving to be the global low-cost provider by economically producing and marketing a mostly standardized product worldwide, whereas a multidomestic strategy entails pursuing broad differentiation and striving to strongly differentiate its products in one country from the products it sells in other countries.
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66. Which of the following is the most UNLIKELY element of a "think global, act global" approach to crafting a global strategy? A. Having minimal responsiveness to buyer tastes, cultural traditions, and market conditions in each country market B. Scattering plants across many countries, with each plant producing product versions for local area markets C. Utilizing the same competitive capabilities, distribution channels, and marketing approaches worldwide D. Requiring local managers in host countries to stick close to the chosen global strategy E. Selling much the same products under the same brand names worldwide
answer
B. Scattering plants across many countries, with each plant producing product versions for local area markets
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The approach of a firm using a "think global, act local" version of a transnational strategy entails: A. producing and marketing a variety of product versions under the same brand name, with each different version being designed specifically to accommodate the needs and preferences of buyers in a particular country. B. having little or no strategy coordination across countries. C. pursuing the same basic competitive strategy theme (low cost, differentiation, best cost, focused) in all countries where the firm does business but giving local managers some latitude to adjust product attributes to better satisfy local buyers and to adjust production, distribution, and marketing to be responsive to local market conditions. D. selling the company's products under a wide variety of brand names (often one brand for each country or group of neighboring countries) so buyers in each country market will think they are buying a locally made brand. E. selling numerous product versions (each customized to buyer tastes in one or more countries and sometimes branded for each country),but opting to only sell direct to buyers at the company's website so as to bypass the costs of establishing networks of wholesale/retail dealers in each country market.
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C. pursuing the same basic competitive strategy theme (low cost, differentiation, best cost, focused) in all countries where the firm does business but giving local managers some latitude to adjust product attributes to better satisfy local buyers and to adjust production, distribution, and marketing to be responsive to local market conditions.
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The essential difference between a "think global, act global" and a "think global, act local" approach to strategy-making is that: A. a "think global, act global" approach entails extensive strategy coordination across countries and a "think global, act local" approach entails little or no strategy coordination across countries. B. the former aims at implementing the same business model worldwide, whereas the latter aims at implementing customized business models to better match local market circumstances. C. the "think global, act local" approach gives local managers more latitude to make minor strategy variations where necessary to better satisfy local buyers and to better match local market conditions. D. a "think global, act global" approach involves selling a mostly standardized product worldwide, whereas a "think global, act local" approach entails selling products that are highly differentiated from country to country. E. a "think global, act global" approach involves selling under a single brand name worldwide, whereas a "think global, act local" approach entails utilizing multiple brands (typically one for each different country or group of neighboring countries).
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C. the "think global, act local" approach gives local managers more latitude to make minor strategy variations where necessary to better satisfy local buyers and to better match local market conditions.
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A primary drawback of a global strategy is that it: A. allows firms to address local needs as precisely as locally based rivals can. B. permits firms to be more responsive to changes in local market conditions, either in the form of new opportunities or competitive threats. C. provides for lower transportation costs and also may involve higher tariffs. D. involves higher coordination costs due to more complex tasks of managing a globally integrated enterprise. E. raises production costs due to the greater variety of designs and components.
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D. involves higher coordination costs due to more complex tasks of managing a globally integrated enterprise.
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A strategy that incorporates elements of both multidomestic and global strategies is termed a "transnational" strategy, but sometimes it is referred to as a(n): A. glocalization strategy. B. international strategy. C. think-local, act-global strategy. D. cross-border integrated strategy. E. standardized integrated strategy.
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A. glocalization strategy.
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Companies often implement a transnational strategy because it: A. combines flexible coordination with the pursuit of conflicting objectives simultaneously. B. provides an easy mode of operating to transfer and share resources and capabilities across borders. C. is conducive to mass customization techniques that enable companies to address local preferences in an efficient semi-standard manner. D. is the least complex and easiest to implement of all the strategy choices. E. is capable of achieving an efficiency potential through centralized decision making and strong headquarter control.
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C. is conducive to mass customization techniques that enable companies to address local preferences in an efficient semi-standard manner.
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What strategy is considered more conducive to transferring and leveraging subsidiary skills and capabilities across borders? A. A transnational strategy B. An international strategy C. A think-local, act-global strategy D. A cross-border integrated strategy E. A standardized integrated strategy
answer
A. A transnational strategy
question
Companies that compete internationally can pursue competitive advantage in world markets(or offset domestic disadvantages) by: A. using a differentiation-based competitive strategy in those country markets with superior resources. B. choosing not to compete in countries with high tariffs and high taxes (which then have to be passed along to buyers in the form of higher prices), thus keeping costs and prices lower than rivals. C. using an export strategy to circumvent the risks of adverse exchange rate fluctuations. D. locating value chain activities in whatever nations prove most advantageous in a manner that uses location to lower costs or achieve greater product differentiation, allow for the transfer of competitively valuable competencies and capabilities from one country to another, and allow for cross-border coordination. E. employing a multidomestic strategy instead of a global strategy.
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D. locating value chain activities in whatever nations prove most advantageous in a manner that uses location to lower costs or achieve greater product differentiation, allow for the transfer of competitively valuable competencies and capabilities from one country to another, and allow for cross-border coordination.
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In expanding into foreign markets, a company can strive to gain competitive advantage (or offset domestic disadvantages) by: A. building a state-of-the-art facility to fully capture scale economies via an export strategy. B. using export, licensing, or franchising strategies so as to minimize risk and capital investment. C. locating buyer-related activities in all countries where it sells its product. D. dispersing its activities among various countries in a manner that lowers costs or else helps achieve greater product differentiation and transferring competitively valuable competencies and capabilities from its domestic operations to its operations in foreign markets. E. avoiding the use of strategies that entail coordinating its domestic strategic moves with its strategic moves in the various foreign markets it enters.
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D. dispersing its activities among various countries in a manner that lowers costs or else helps achieve greater product differentiation and transferring competitively valuable competencies and capabilities from its domestic operations to its operations in foreign markets.
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To use location to build competitive advantage, a company that operates transnationally or globally must: A. employ either an export strategy or a franchising strategy. B. scatter its production plants across many countries in different parts of the world so as to minimize transportation costs. C. consider whether to concentrate each activity it performs in a few select countries or disperse performance of the activity to many nations and consider in which countries to locate particular activities. D. locate production plants in those countries having suppliers that can supply all the necessary raw materials and components so as to avoid inbound shipping costs. E. concentrate all of its value chain activities in the one country that has the best combination of low wage rates, low shipping costs, and low tax rates on profits.
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C. consider whether to concentrate each activity it performs in a few select countries or disperse performance of the activity to many nations and consider in which countries to locate particular activities.
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In competing in foreign markets, companies find it advantageous to concentrate their activities in a limited number of locations in all of these situations, EXCEPT when: A. there are significant scale economies in performing an activity. B. the costs of manufacturing or other activities are significantly lower in some geographic locations than in others. C. when there is a steep learning or experience curve associated with performing an activity in a single location (thus making it economical to serve the whole world market from just one or maybe a few locations). D. certain locations have superior resources, allow better coordination of related activities, or offer other valuable advantages. E. the addition of new production capacity will not adversely impact the supply-demand balance in the local market.
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E. the addition of new production capacity will not adversely impact the supply-demand balance in the local market.
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When concentrating production in a few locations, which of the following can allow a manufacturer to lower unit costs, boost quality, or master a new technology more quickly? A. Significant scale economies B. Learning-curve effects C. Superior resources D. Profit sanctuaries E. Supporting industries
answer
B. Learning-curve effects
question
Dispersing the performance of value chain activities to many different countries rather than concentrating them in a few country locations tends to be advantageous in all of the following situations, EXCEPT: A. when high transportation costs make it expensive to operate from central locations. B. whenever buyer-related activities are best performed in locations close to buyers. C. if diseconomies of large size exist, thereby making it more economical to perform an activity on a smaller scale in several different locations. D. when it is desirable to hedge against (1) the risks of fluctuating exchange rates, (2) supply interruptions or (3) adverse political developments. E. if resources retain their foreign contexts so there is competitive advantage over a broader domain.
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E. if resources retain their foreign contexts so there is competitive advantage over a broader domain.
question
The competitive advantage opportunities that a global competitor can gain by dispersing performance of its activities across many nations include all of the following, EXCEPT: A. being able to shift production from one country to another to take advantage of exchange rate fluctuations, differing wage rates, differing energy costs, or differing trade restrictions. B. being in better position to choose where and how to challenge rivals. C. shortening delivery times to customers by having geographically scattered distribution facilities. D. locating buyer-related activities (such as sales, advertising, after-sale service and technical assistance) close to buyers. E. centralizing value chain activities to foster just-in-time inventory activities.
answer
E. centralizing value chain activities to foster just-in-time inventory activities.
question
Dispersing particular value chain activities across many countries rather than concentrating them in a select few countries can be more advantageous, EXCEPT when: A. buyer-related activities (such as sales, advertising, after-sale service and technical assistance) need to take place close to buyers. B. buyers demand short delivery times and/or high transportation costs make it uneconomical to operate from one or just a few locations. C. it helps hedge against the risks of exchange rate fluctuations, supply disruptions, and adverse political developments. D. there are diseconomies of scale in trying to operate from a single location. E. there are reasons to decouple buyer-related activities in favor of locational advantages.
answer
E. there are reasons to decouple buyer-related activities in favor of locational advantages.
question
Transferring core competencies and resource strengths from one country market to another is: A. a good way for companies to develop broader or deeper competencies and competitive capabilities that can become a strong basis for sustainable competitive advantage. B. best accomplished with a multidomestic strategy as opposed to a global strategy. C. feasible only with a global strategy; it can't be done with a multidomestic strategy. D. unlikely to result in a competitive advantage. E. nearly always the easiest and most sure-fire way to build competitive advantage in trying to compete successfully in foreign markets.
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A. a good way for companies to develop broader or deeper competencies and competitive capabilities that can become a strong basis for sustainable competitive advantage.
question
A key approach for a company to grow sales and profits in several country markets is to: A. transfer its valuable competencies and resource strengths among these markets to aid in the development of broader competencies and capabilities. B. employ a multidomestic strategy rather than a global strategy. C. locate technical after-sale services close to buyers. D. minimize transportation costs among these markets. E. take advantage of less restrictive restrictions and requirements of host governments.
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A. transfer its valuable competencies and resource strengths among these markets to aid in the development of broader competencies and capabilities.
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Companies that compete on an international basis have a competitive advantage over their purely domestic rivals: A. to achieve a larger domestic interest by developing sufficient resource strengths and competitive capabilities for success. B. to benefit from coordinating activities across different countries' domains. C. solely for the benefit of their shareholders. D. that guarantees the generation of big profits, big returns on investment, and big cash surpluses after dividends are paid. E. to give full access to the proprietary technological expertise or other competitively valuable capabilities.
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B. to benefit from coordinating activities across different countries' domains.
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Sharing and transferring resources and capabilities across borders may also contribute to the development of broader or deeper competencies and capabilities, thereby helping a company achieve: A. control over its resource capabilities. B. dominating depth in some competitively valuable area C. intensity of resource diversification. D. precision and compliance in resource agility and responsiveness E. direct investments in foreign countries.
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B. dominating depth in some competitively valuable area
question
Profit sanctuaries are country markets or geographic regions where: A. a company can rank the competitive advantage opportunities in each industry. B. a company possesses good strategic fit with other businesses and identifies the value chain where this fit occurs. C. a company derives substantial profits because of its protected market position or unassailable competitive advantage. D. a company creates substantial investment strategies because it is losing competitive advantage over competitors. E. a company invests its dividends in expanding its foreign market presence.
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C. a company derives substantial profits because of its protected market position or unassailable competitive advantage.
question
Profit sanctuaries are found to differ by a company's strategy, such that a(n): A. domestic-only company has access to many profit sanctuary locations worldwide. B. international competitor usually has a profit sanctuary in its home market and may have other sanctuaries in countries where it has a strong position and market share. C. globally competitive company generally has a profit sanctuary outside its home market in countries where it is a market leader and enjoys a strong competitive position. D. transnational company has profit sanctuaries in every country where it operates. E. company competing in a few country markets has more profit sanctuaries.
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B. international competitor usually has a profit sanctuary in its home market and may have other sanctuaries in countries where it has a strong position and market share.
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What supports competitive offensives in one market with resources and profits diverted from operations in another market? A. Cross-market subsidization B. A foreign market strategy C. A domestic-only company D. A home market offensive E. A multidomestic company
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A. Cross-market subsidization
question
What does the World Trade Organization (WTO) NOT do primarily? A. Promotes fair trade practices B. Actively polices dumping C. Deals with the rules of trade between nations D. Helps producers, exporters, and importers conduct business E. Sets countries' tariff rates
answer
E. Sets countries' tariff rates
question
What is it called when a company sells its goods in foreign markets at prices that are below the prices at which it normally sells in its home market or well below its full costs per unit? A. Dumping practices B. Price-clearing system C. Clearance sale D. Discounting practices E. Competitive advantage
answer
A. Dumping practices
question
What can happen when international rivals compete against one another in multiple-country markets? A. It could create attractive industries that would have otherwise badly deteriorated. B. It could produce a business lineup consisting of too many slow-growth, declining, low-margin, or competitively weak businesses. C. It could create a greater diversity in the types of value chain activities between each business. D. It could initiate a deterrence effect that encourages mutual restraint in taking aggressive action against one another due to the fear of a retaliatory response that might escalate the battle into a cross-border competitive war. E. It could increase shareholder interests by concentrating corporate resources on foreign business activities to contend for market leadership.
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D. It could initiate a deterrence effect that encourages mutual restraint in taking aggressive action against one another due to the fear of a retaliatory response that might escalate the battle into a cross-border competitive war.
question
Companies racing for global market leadership: A. generally have to consider establishing competitive positions in the markets of emerging countries. B. are well-advised to avoid all the risks and problems of competing in emerging country markets. C. seldom have the resource capabilities it takes to be effective in competing in emerging country markets and usually are at a strong competitive disadvantage to the domestic market leaders. D. can usually be expected to earn sizable profits quickly in emerging country markets. E. usually encounter very low barriers in entering the markets of emerging countries.
answer
A. generally have to consider establishing competitive positions in the markets of emerging countries.
question
Which of the following is NOT a typical option that companies have to consider to tailor their strategy to fit the circumstances of emerging country markets? A. Prepare to compete on the basis of low price. B. Modify aspects of the company's business model to accommodate local circumstances (but not so much that the company loses the advantage of global scale and global branding). C. Change the local market to better match the way the company does business elsewhere. D. Develop a strategy for the short-term and forget about a long-term strategy because conditions in emerging country markets change so rapidly. E. Stay away from those emerging markets where it is impractical or uneconomic to modify the company's business model to accommodate local circumstances.
answer
D. Develop a strategy for the short-term and forget about a long-term strategy because conditions in emerging country markets change so rapidly.
question
Viable strategic options companies should consider in tailoring their strategy to fit circumstances of emerging country markets include all of the following, EXCEPT: A. trying to change the local market to better match the way the company does business elsewhere. B. being prepared to modify aspects of the company's business model to accommodate local circumstances. C. preparing to compete on the basis of low price. D. staying away from those emerging markets where it is impractical to modify the company's business model to accommodate local circumstances. E. focusing on local markets whose circumstances will be most challenging to the company's business model.
answer
E. focusing on local markets whose circumstances will be most challenging to the company's business model.
question
Which of the following is an example of a modification in the company's business model to accommodate the unique local circumstances of developing countries? A. Mahindra and Mahindra ranked number one in J. D. Power Asia Pacific's new-vehicle overall quality category. B. Home Depot could rely on its value propositions only in some developing countries. C. Unilever developed a low-cost detergent, named Wheel, for the Indian market. D. Japan is known for its competitive strength in consumer electronics. E. In China, Dell moved from its traditional Internet-based orders to orders over phone and fax.
answer
E. In China, Dell moved from its traditional Internet-based orders to orders over phone and fax.
question
The basic strategy options for local companies in competing against global challengers include: A. best-cost provider and focused low-cost provider and low-cost leadership strategies. B. export strategies, licensing strategies, and cross-border transfer strategies. C. utilizing understanding of local customer needs and preferences to create customized products or services, developing business models to exploit shortcoming in local infrastructure, and using acquisitions and rapid growth to defend against expansion-minded multinationals. D. franchising strategies, multidomestic strategies keyed to product superiority, global low-cost leadership strategies, and cross-border coordination strategies. E. focused differentiation and broad differentiation strategies.
answer
C. utilizing understanding of local customer needs and preferences to create customized products or services, developing business models to exploit shortcoming in local infrastructure, and using acquisitions and rapid growth to defend against expansion-minded multinationals.
question
Televisa, a Mexican media company, became the world's most prolific producer of Spanish-language soap operas owing to its expertise in Spanish culture and linguistics. Which of the following strategies did Televisa employ to defend against global giants? A. Develop business models that exploit shortcomings in local distribution networks or infrastructure. B. Utilize keen understanding of local customer needs and preferences to create customized products or services. C. Take advantage of aspects of the local workforce with which large international companies may be unfamiliar. D. Transfer company expertise to cross-border markets and initiate actions to contend on an international level. E. Use acquisition and rapid-growth strategies to better defend against expansion-minded internationals.
answer
D. Transfer company expertise to cross-border markets and initiate actions to contend on an international level.
question
Which of the following is NOT a viable strategy option for a local company in competing against global challengers? A. Using cross-market transfer strategies to hedge against the risks of exchange rate fluctuations and adverse political developments B. Developing business models to exploit shortcomings in local distribution networks or infrastructures C. Taking advantage of low-cost labor and other competitively important local workforce qualities D. Transferring a company's expertise to cross-border markets and initiating actions to contend on a global scale E. Using acquisitions and rapid growth strategies to defend against expansion-minded multinationals
answer
A. Using cross-market transfer strategies to hedge against the risks of exchange rate fluctuations and adverse political developments