The Social Self example #50159

21 June 2024
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Socialization
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The interactive process through which people learn the basic skills, values, beliefs, and behavior patterns of a society
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Me
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The part of ourselves that is aware of the expectations and attitudes of society; the socialized self.
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Role-taking forms the basis of the socialization process by allowing us to anticipate what others expect of us, thus learning to see ourselves through the eyes of others.
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T
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Generalized other
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The internalized attitudes, expectations, and viewpoints of society that we use to guide our behavior and reinforce our sense of self.
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The theory that refers to seeing ourselves as others see us in addition to taking on or pretending to take on the roles of others is known as
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NOT The looking-glass self
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When identifying and comparing points of view while reading sociology, it is important to determine the nature of the source and read each source carefully.
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T
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Lack of interaction with social and cultural environments transforms people into members of society.
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F
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I
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The unsocialized, spontaneous, self-interested component of personality and self-identity.
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As we grow older, significant others become more important.
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T
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The looking-glass self
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Cooley: The looking-glass self refers to the interactive process by which we develop an image of ourselves based on how we imagine we appear to others.
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Self
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Self refers to the conscious awareness of possessing a distinct identity that separates us from other members of society.
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Role-taking
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Mead: Role-taking is taking or pretending to take the role of others.
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Significant others
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Significant others are specific people, such as parents, brothers, sisters, and other relatives, who have a direct influence on our socialization.
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Tabula Rasa
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John Locke: Each person is a blank slate at birth with no personality. People develop personality as a result of social experiences. Infants can be molded into any type of person
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Socialization is the interactive process through which people learn the basic skills, values, beliefs, and behavior patterns of a society.
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T
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This theory that insists that each of us is born without a personality and we acquire our personality as a result of social experiences is known as
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The Tabula Rasa.
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Explain the "I" and "me" in role-making.
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The "I" is the unsocialized, spontaneous, self-interested component of personality and self-identity. The "me," on the other hand, is the part of ourselves that is aware of the expectations and attitudes of societyβ€”the socialized self. During childhood, the "I" component is dominant. However, through the process of socialization, the "me" gains power by acting together with the "I," which in turn brings the "I" in line with expectations of society. Therefore, to develop as a well-rounded member of society, a person needs both aspects of the self.
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Role-taking was developed by
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George Herbert Mead.
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Socialization encompass the following processes:
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* Learning basic skills * Learning behavior patterns of society * Learning values and beliefs
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Charles Horton Cooley devised the Tabula Rasa theory.
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F
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The Tabula Rasa was developed by
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John Locke.
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The concept of the Looking-Glass Self was developed by
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Charles Horton Cooley.
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The theory that refers to the interactive process by which we develop an image of ourselves based on how we imagine we appear to others is known as
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The Looking-glass self.
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Tabula Rasa theory believes that individuals are born with some personality.
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F
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People that include parents, siblings, relatives, and others who have a direct influence on our socialization.
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Significant others