Character And Point Of View In "The Most Dangerous Game," Part 1

25 July 2022
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question
Read the excerpt from "The Most Dangerous Game." The lights of the chateau were out now, and it was dark and silent, but there was a fragment of sallow moon, and by its wan light he could see, dimly, the courtyard. There, weaving in and out in the pattern of shadow, were black, noiseless forms; the hounds heard him at the window and looked up, expectantly, with their green eyes. Rainsford went back to the bed and lay down. By many methods he tried to put himself to sleep. He had achieved a doze when, just as morning began to come, he heard, far off in the jungle, the faint report of a pistol. The details of the excerpt show that Rainsford knows he
answer
is trapped in dangerous place.
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Read the excerpt from "The Most Dangerous Game." Again Rainsford lifted the heavy knocker, and let it fall. The door opened then, opened as suddenly as if it were on a spring, and Rainsford stood blinking in the river of glaring gold light that poured out. The first thing Rainsford's eyes discerned was the largest man Rainsford had ever seen—a gigantic creature, solidly made and black bearded to the waist. In his hand the man held a long-barreled revolver, and he was pointing it straight at Rainsford's heart. The details of this excerpt show that Rainsford sees Ivan as a(n)___ individual.
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alarming
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Read the excerpt from "The Most Dangerous Game." "I wanted the ideal animal to hunt," explained the general. "So I said: 'What are the attributes of an ideal quarry?' And the answer was, of course, 'It must have courage, cunning, and, above all, it must be able to reason.'" "But no animal can reason," objected Rainsford. "My dear fellow," said the general, "there is one that can." "But you can't mean—" gasped Rainsford. "And why not?" "I can't believe you are serious, General Zaroff. This is a grisly joke." "Why should I not be serious? I am speaking of hunting." "Hunting? General Zaroff, what you speak of is murder." Rainsford's response to Zaroff indicates that
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he is opposed to the idea of hunting humans.
question
A character foil is a character who acts as a _____by highlighting one of another character's qualities.
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contrast
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In the story "The Most Dangerous Game." General Zaroff is the character foil for
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Rainsford
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Read the excerpt from "The Most Dangerous Game." Laughter shook the general. "How extraordinarily droll you are!" he said. "One does not expect nowadays to find a young man of the educated class, even in America, with such a naive, and, if I may say so, mid-Victorian point of view. It's like finding a snuff-box in a limousine. Ah, well, doubtless you had Puritan ancestors. So many Americans appear to have had. I'll wager you'll forget your notions when you go hunting with me. You've a genuine new thrill in store for you, Mr. Rainsford." "Thank you, I'm a hunter, not a murderer." "Dear me," said the general, quite unruffled, "again that unpleasant word. But I think I can show you that your scruples are quite ill founded." Which detail best reveals that Rainsford opposes Zaroff's idea of the ideal prey?
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"Thank you, I'm a hunter, not a murderer."
question
Read the excerpt from "The Most Dangerous Game." "A twenty-two," he remarked. "That's odd. It must have been a fairly large animal too. The hunter had his nerve with him to tackle it with a light gun. It's clear that the brute put up a fight. I suppose the first three shots I heard was when the hunter flushed his quarry and wounded it. The last shot was when he trailed it here and finished it." What does this line of dialogue reveal about Rainsford's character?
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He is a very experienced hunter.
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Read the excerpt from "The Most Dangerous Game." Rainsford's first impression was that the man was singularly handsome; his second was that there was an original, almost bizarre quality about the general's face. He was a tall man past middle age, for his hair was a vivid white; but his thick eyebrows and pointed military mustache were as black as the night from which Rainsford had come. His eyes, too, were black and very bright. He had high cheek bones, a sharp-cut nose, a spare, dark face, the face of a man used to giving orders, the face of an aristocrat. Turning to the giant in uniform, the general made a sign. The giant put away his pistol, saluted, withdrew. What details from the narration relate Rainsford's impression of Zaroff? Check all that apply.
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almost bizarre quality about the general's face his thick eyebrows and pointed military mustache were as black as the night his eyes, too, were black and very bright the face of an aristocrat
question
Read the excerpt from "The Most Dangerous Game." "Nonsense," laughed Rainsford. "This hot weather is making you soft, Whitney. Be a realist. The world is made up of two classes—the hunters and the huntees. Luckily, you and I are the hunters. Do you think we've passed that island yet?" Read the excerpt of Zaroff speaking from "The Most Dangerous Game." "Life is for the strong, to be lived by the strong, and, if needs be, taken by the strong. The weak of the world were put here to give the strong pleasure. I am strong. Why should I not use my gift? If I wish to hunt, why should I not? I hunt the scum of the earth—sailors from tramp ships—lascars, blacks, Chinese, whites, mongrels—a thoroughbred horse or hound is worth more than a score of them." How do these excerpts show the difference between Rainsford and Zaroff?
answer
Rainsford believes that animals are inferior to humans and therefore deserve to be hunted, while Zaroff feels this way about other humans.
question
Read the excerpt from "The Most Dangerous Game." He struggled up to the surface and tried to cry out, but the wash from the speeding yacht slapped him in the face and the salt water in his open mouth made him gag and strangle. Desperately he struck out with strong strokes after the receding lights of the yacht, but he stopped before he had swum fifty feet. A certain cool-headedness had come to him; it was not the first time he had been in a tight place. There was a chance that his cries could be heard by someone aboard the yacht, but that chance was slender, and grew more slender as the yacht raced on. He wrestled himself out of his clothes, and shouted with all his power. The lights of the yacht became faint and ever-vanishing fireflies; then they were blotted out entirely by the night. Rainsford remembered the shots. They had come from the right, and doggedly he swam in that direction, swimming with slow, deliberate strokes, conserving his strength. For a seemingly endless time he fought the sea. He began to count his strokes; he could do possibly a hundred more and then— What details from the narration show that Rainsford is a rational individual who does well in moments of danger? Check all that apply.
answer
A certain cool-headedness had come to him;[D]oggedly he swam in that direction, swimming with slow, deliberate strokes, conserving his strength.