BLS Other: Rescue Breathing, Advanced Airway, Choking, Opioids

25 July 2022
4.7 (114 reviews)
14 test answers

Unlock all answers in this set

Unlock answers (10)
question
1. When delivering back slaps to an infant who is choking, the rescuer should use the heel of the hand and forcefully deliver the slap between the infant's shoulder blades.
answer
True
question
relieve choking in a responsive infant
answer
Step 1 If you find an infant choking, and he or she is responsive, first sit or kneel with the infant in your lap. Hold the infant facedown and resting on your forearm, with the head slightly lower than the chest. Note: If it is easy to do, remove clothing from the infant's chest. Step 2 Support the head and jaw with your hand. Avoid compressing the soft tissues of the infant's throat Step 3 Rest your forearm on your thigh to provide support. Deliver up to 5 back slaps forcefully between the infant's shoulder blades, using the heel of your hand. Deliver each slap with sufficient force to attempt to remove the foreign body. Step 4 Rest your forearm on your thigh to provide support. Deliver up to 5 back slaps forcefully between the infant's shoulder blades, using the heel of your hand. Deliver each slap with sufficient force to attempt to remove the foreign body. Step 5 Keep the infant's head lower than the chest, and deliver up to 5 quick downward chest thrusts in the same location that you perform compressions—just below the nipple line, over the lower half of the breastbone. Do this at the rate of about 1 per second. Step 6 Repeat the sequence of 5 back slaps and 5 chest thrusts until the object is removed or until the infant becomes unresponsive.
question
The compression rate when an advanced airway is in place should remain at 100 to 120/min, with no pause to .
answer
**no pause in compressions to deliver breaths.
question
Rescue breathing for adults
answer
1 breath every 5-6 seconds or 10-12 breaths per minute
question
Rescue breathing for children and infants
answer
1 breath every 3-5 seconds or 12-20 breaths per minute. each breath over one second
question
During rescue breaths check the pulse
answer
every 2 minutes
question
Rescue breathing is providing breaths to a victim who has
answer
a pulse but is not breathing
question
When an advanced airway is in place during 2-rescuer CPR, the technique for CPR changes. For all ages, perform continual compressions at a rate of 100 to 120/min without pauses for breaths, and give 1 breath every
answer
6 seconds (10 breaths per minute).
question
a medication that can reverse the effects of opioids and may restore normal breathing.
answer
Naloxone
question
For a suspected opioid-associated life-threatening emergency in a victim who is unresponsive and not breathing normally but does have a pulse, the rescuer should give 1 breath
answer
every 5 to 6 seconds in an adult, and every 3 to 5 seconds in a child or infant. Then, if local protocol allows, the rescuer may give naloxone. But the rescuer should not delay breaths to give naloxone
question
Choking signs of poor air exchange and breathing difficulty
answer
Silent cough, inability to speak or breath, cyanosis, may clutch neck with both hands, if they can't talk
question
How to Perform Abdominal Thrusts
answer
Step 1 Stand or kneel behind the victim and place your arms around the victim's waist; with one hand, locate the navel. Step 2 Then, make a fist with the other hand and place the thumb side of your fist against the victim's abdomen, just ABOVE the navel and BELOW the breastbone. Step 3 Grasp your fist with the other hand and press your fist into the victim's abdomen with a quick, forceful upward thrust. Step 4 Repeat thrusts until the object is expelled from the airway or the victim becomes unresponsive
question
If the victim is too large for you to wrap your arms around the waist, do
answer
chest thrusts instead of abdominal thrusts
question
Relief of Choking in an Unresponsive Adult or Child
answer
Send someone to call 911 lower victim to the ground and begin CPR Every time you open the airway to perform breaths, look for the obstructing object in the back of the throat. Don't perform a blind finger sweep