APUSH Chapter 30 example #71021

20 June 2024
4.7 (214 reviews)
63 test answers

Unlock all answers in this set

Unlock answers (59)
question
New Frontier
answer
Kennedy's plan, supports civil rights, pushes for a space program, wans to cut taxes, and increase spending for defense and military
question
New Frontier
answer
..., The campaign program advocated by JFK in the 1960 election. He promised to revitalize the stagnant economy and enact reform legislation in education, health care, and civil rights.
question
New Frontier
answer
Group of domestic policies proposed by JFK that included Medicare and aid to education and urban renewal; many of these policies were not enacted until the presidency of Lyndon Johnson.
question
Flexible Response
answer
Flexible response calls for mutual deterrence at strategic, tactical, and conventional levels, giving the United States the capability to respond to aggression across the spectrum of warfare, not limited only to nuclear arms.
question
Flexible Response
answer
the buildup of conventional troops and weapons to allow a nation to fight a limited war without using nuclear weapons
question
Flexible Response
answer
A policy, developed during the Kennedy administration, that involved preparing for a variety of military responses to international crises rather than focusing on the use of nuclear weapons.
question
Berlin Wall
answer
A fortified wall surrounding West Berlin, Germany, built in 1961 to prevent East German citizens from traveling to the West. Its demolition in 1989 symbolized the end of the Cold War. This wall was both a deterrent to individuals trying to escape and a symbol of repression to the free world.
question
Berlin Wall
answer
(HT), a wall separating East AKA People's Republic of Germany (controlled by Russia) and West Berlin AKA German Federal Republic (controlled by Britain, France, and America) built by East Germany in 1961 to keep citizens from escaping to the West
question
Berlin Wall
answer
In 1961, the Soviet Union built a high barrier to seal off their sector of Berlin in order to stop the flow of refugees out of the Soviet zone of Germany. The wall was torn down in 1989.
question
Bay of Pigs
answer
In April 1961, a group of Cuban exiles organized and supported by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency landed on the southern coast of Cuba in an effort to overthrow Fidel Castro. When the invasion ended in disaster, President Kennedy took full responsibility for the failure.
question
Bay of Pigs
answer
An unsuccessful invasion of Cuba in 1961, which was sponsored by the United States. Its purpose was to overthrow Cuban dictator Fidel Castro.
question
Bay of Pigs
answer
1961 - 1400 American-trained Cuban expatriates left from Nicaragua to try to topple Castro's regime, landing at the Bay of Pigs in southern Cuba. They had expected a popular uprising to sweep them to victory, but the local populace refused to support them. When promised U.S. air cover also failed to materialize, the invaders were easily killed or captured by the Cuban forces. Many of the survivors were ransomed back to the U.S. for $64 million. President Kennedy had directed the operation.
question
Cuban Missile Crisis
answer
(JFK) , , an international crisis in October 1962, the closest approach to nuclear war at any time between the U.S. and the USSR. When the U.S. discovered Soviet nuclear missiles on Cuba, President John F. Kennedy demanded their removal and announced a naval blockade of the island; the Soviet leader Khrushchev acceded to the U.S. demands a week later, on condition that US doesn't invade Cuba
question
Cuban Missile Crisis
answer
1962 crisis that arose between the United States and the Soviet Union over a Soviet attempt to deploy nuclear missiles in Cuba
question
Cuban Missile Crisis
answer
1962 crisis that arose between the United States and the Soviet Union over a Soviet attempt to deploy nuclear missiles in Cuba.
question
CORE
answer
an organization founded by James Leonard Farmer in 1942 to work for racial equality
question
CORE
answer
First civil rights organization to use non-violent tactics to promote racial equality and desegregation
question
CORE
answer
Congress of Racial Equality, an organization founded by James Leonard Farmer in 1942 to work for racial equality
question
March on Washington
answer
held in 1963 to show support for the Civil Rights Bill in Congress. Martin Luther King gave his famous "I have a dream..." speech. 250,000 people attended the rally
question
March on Washington
answer
In August 1963, civil rights leaders organized a massive rally in Washington to urge passage of President Kennedy's civil rights bill. The high point came when MLK Jr., gave his "I Have a Dream" speech to more than 200,000 marchers in front of the Lincoln Memorial.
question
March on Washington
answer
"I Have A Dream" @ Lincoln memorial
question
Civil Rights Act of 1964
answer
1964; banned discrimination in public acomodations, prohibited discrimination in any federally assisted program, outlawed discrimination in most employment; enlarged federal powers to protect voting rights and to speed school desegregation; this and the voting rights act helped to give African-Americans equality on paper, and more federally-protected power so that social equality was a more realistic goal
question
Civil Rights Act of 1964
answer
FEDERAL LEGISLATION THAT PROHIBITS DISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, SEX OR NATIONAL ORIGIN
question
Civil Rights Act of 1964
answer
A federal law that authorized federal action against segregation in public accommodations, public facilities, and employment. The law was passed during a period of great strength for the civil rights movement, and President Lyndon Johnson persuaded many reluctant members of Congress to support the law.
question
Baker v. Carr (1962)
answer
(LBJ) 1962 Baker v. Carr, case decided in 1962 by the U.S. Supreme Court. Tennessee had failed to reapportion the state legislature for 60 years despite population growth and redistribution. Charles Baker, a voter, brought suit against the state (Joe Carr was a state official in charge of elections) in federal district court, claiming that the dilution of his vote as a result of the state's failure to reapportion violated the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. The court dismissed the complaint on the grounds that it could not decide a political question. Baker appealed to the Supreme Court, which ruled that a case raising a political issue would be heard. This landmark decision opened the way for numerous suits on legislative apportionment.
question
Baker v. Carr (1962)
answer
baker filed suit against carr due to redistricting violations; ruling denied equal protection of laws garunteed the people by the 14th amendment
question
Baker v. Carr (1962)
answer
..., "One man, one vote." Ordered state legislative districts to be as near equal as possible in population; Warren Court's judicial activism.
question
Engel v. Vitale (1962)
answer
A nondenominational prayer was authorized to be said at the start of each day at local public schools. Result: The prayer violated the establishment clause. = 1st A.
question
Engel v. Vitale (1962)
answer
1962: Prohibited state-sponsored recitation of prayer in public schools by virtue of the 1st Amendment's Establishment Clause and the 14th Amendment's Due Process Clause.
question
Engel v. Vitale (1962)
answer
The 1962 Supreme Court decision holding that state officials violated the First Amendment when they wrote a prayer to be recited by New York's schoolchildren.
question
Election of 1964
answer
LBJ beats Senator Goldwater who voted against the civil rights act and was a conservative republican
question
Election of 1964
answer
Barry Goldwater (R) vs. LBJ (D) Signaled important political changes. Last time democrats could win by proposing New Deal-ish programs that increased government power
question
Election of 1964
answer
LBJ v. Goldwater-a very conservative Republican
question
War of Poverty
answer
Lyndon Johnson's program to help Americans escape poverty with education, job training and community development.
question
War of Poverty
answer
This was Legislation that was proposed by President Johnson in 1964 in his State of the Union Address. This was a response to the United States national poverty rate being 19 percent. This was significant because it led to the United States Congress to pass the Economic Opportunity Act which established the Office of Economic Opportunity which administered to the local application of federal funds targeted against poverty.
question
War of Poverty
answer
Lyndon Johnson's program to help Americans escape poverty with education, job training and community development.
question
Great Society
answer
President Johnson called his version of the Democratic reform program the Great Society. In 1965, Congress passed many Great Society measures, including Medicare, civil rights legislation, and federal aid to education.
question
Great Society
answer
1964, LBJ's policies of fighting poverty and racial injustice
question
Great Society
answer
1960s; President Lyndon B. Johnson; Set of domestic programs proposed by Johnson, spending programs that addressed education, medical care, urban problems, and transportation
question
Medicare
answer
A federal program of health insurance for persons 65 years of age and older
question
Medicare
answer
A program added to the Social Security system in 1965 that provides hospitalization insurance for the elderly and permits older Americans to purchase inexpensive coverage for doctor fees and other health expenses.
question
Medicare
answer
A federal health-insurance program that covers U.S. residents over the age of sixtyfive. The costs are met by a tax on wages and salaries.
question
Voting Rights Act of 1965
answer
1965; invalidated the use of any test or device to deny the vote and authorized federal examiners to register voters in states that had disenfranchised blacks; as more blacks became politically active and elected black representatives, it brought jobs, contracts, and facilities and services for the black community, encouraging greater social equality and decreasing the wealth and education gap
question
Voting Rights Act of 1965
answer
A law designed to help end formal and informal barriers to African American suffrage. Under the law, hundreds of thousands of African Americans were registered and the number of African American elected officials increased dramatically.
question
Voting Rights Act of 1965
answer
A landmark piece of national legislation in the United States that outlawed discriminatory voting practices that had been responsible for the widespread disenfranchisement of African Americans in the U.S.
question
Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
answer
1964 Congressional resolution authorizing President Johnson to take military action in Vietnam
question
Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
answer
1964 Congressional resolution that authorized President Johnson to commit US troops to south vietnam and fight a war against north Vietnam
question
Gulf of Tonkin Resolution
answer
The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution was a joint resolution of the U.S. Congress passed on August 7, 1964 in direct response to a minor naval engagement known as the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. It is of historical significance because it gave U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson authorization, without a formal declaration of war by Congress, for the use of military force in Southeast Asia.
question
SDS
answer
Students for a Democratic Society-an antiestablishment New Left group, founded in 1960, this group charged that corporations and large government institutions had taken over America; they called for a restoration of "participatory democracy" and greater individual freedom
question
SDS
answer
-who: Students for Democratic Society, leader: Tom Hade
question
SDS
answer
Or Students for a Democratic Society, a student organization that opposed the war in vietnam and held marches
question
Betty Friedan
answer
1921-2006. American feminist, activist and writer. Best known for starting the "Second Wave" of feminism through the writing of her book "The Feminine Mystique".
question
Betty Friedan
answer
1960s; wrote "The Feminine Mystique," an account of housewives' lives in which they suboordinated their own aspirations to the needs of men; bestseller was an inspiration for many women to join the women's rights movement
question
Betty Friedan
answer
., 1960s; wrote "The Feminine Mystique," an account of housewives' lives in which they suboordinated their own aspirations to the needs of men; bestseller was an inspiration for many women to join the women's rights movement
question
Tet Offensive
answer
1968; National Liberation Front and North Vietnamese forces launched a huge attack on the Vietnamese New Year (Tet), which was defeated after a month of fighting and many thousands of casualties; major defeat for communism, but Americans reacted sharply, with declining approval of LBJ and more anti-war sentiment
question
Tet Offensive
answer
1968, during Tet, the Vietnam lunar new year - Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army raiding forces attacked provincial capitals throughout Vietnam, even seizing the U.S. embassy for a time. U.S. opinion began turning against the war.
question
Tet Offensive
answer
This attack on U.S. forces by Vietnamese communists in 1968 made Americans realize that the U.S. was not close to winning the war in Vietnam.
question
Election of 1968
answer
1968; McCarthy challenged LBJ, who was politically wounded by the Tet Offensive and the Vietnam War; LBJ stepped down from the running, and Kennedy and McCarthy were left on the Democratic ballot; but Americans turned to Republican Nixon to restore social harmony and end the war
question
Election of 1968
answer
Due to unpopular opinion on the Vietnam War, LBJ didn't try to get the democratic nomination, and because RFK was assassinated by Sirhan Sirhan Humphrey got the nomination. Nixon was nominated by the Republican party, and racist f*** George Wallace headed the American Independent Party. Nixon avoided controversy and reaped the benefit of discontent with the Vietnam War, promising to bring a divided country together again and win the war quickly with his nonexistent secret strategy. Humphrey was hounded by anti-war demonstrators and Wallace cut deeply into the normal Democratic majority, attacking black leaders and liberal whites, appealing to a sense of powerlessness among the urban working class. Nixon won the election with a small share of the popular vote, but dominating the electoral vote, winning the Midwest and most of the West, along with the Middle Eastern States. Humphrey won the Northeast, and Wallace won five states in the deep south and made heavy inroads into the blue-collar districts in the North. Significance: Marked a repudiation of the politics of protest and the cultural insurgency of the mid 1960s, the liberal reform impulse died along with the growth of federal power.
question
Election of 1968
answer
-who: Richard Nixon, George Wallace, Hubert Humphre
question
Silent Majority
answer
A phrase used to describe people, whatever their economic status, who uphold traditional values, especially against the counterculture of the 1960s
question
Silent Majority
answer
label nixon gave to middle-class americans who supported him, obeyed the laws, and wanted "peace with honor" in vietnam, he contrasted this group with students and civil rights activists who disrupted the country with protests in the late 1960s and early 1970s
question
Silent Majority
answer
A phrase used by President Richard Nixon to describe people, whatever their economic status, who uphold traditional values, especially against the counterculture of the 1960s