APUSH Chapter 15 People

10 September 2022
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Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888)
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New England-born author of popular novels for adolescents, most notably Little Women.
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Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906)
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Reformer and woman suffragist, She , with long-time friend Elizabeth Cady Stanton, advocated for temperance and women's rights in New York State, established the abolitionist Women's Loyal League during the Civil War, and founded the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1869 to lobby for a constitutional amendment giving women the vote.
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John J. Audubon (1785-1851)
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French-born naturalist and author of the beautifully illustrated Birds of America.
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Amelia Bloomer (1818-1894)
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Reformer and women's rights activist, who championed dress reform for women, wearing short skirts with Turkish trousers or "bloomers", as a healthier and more comfortable alternative to the tight corsets and voluminous skirts popular with women of her day.
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Peter Cartwright (1785-1872)
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Methodist revivalist who traversed the frontier from Tennessee to Illinois in the first decades of the nineteenth century, preaching against slavery and alcohol, and calling on sinners to repent.
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James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851)
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American novelist and a member of New York's Knickerbocker Group, He wrote adventure tales, including The Last of the Mohicans, which won acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic.
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Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)
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Massachusetts-born poet who, despite spending her life as a recluse, created a vivid inner world through her poetry, exploring themes of nature, love, death and immortality. Refusing to publish during her lifetime, she left behind nearly two thousand poems, which were published after her death.
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Dorothea Dix (1802-1887)
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New England teacher-author and champion of mental health reform, She assembled damning reports on insane asylums and petitioned the Massachusetts legislature to improve conditions.
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Neal S. Dow (1804-1897)
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Nineteenth century temperance activist, dubbed the "Father of Prohibition" for his sponsorship of the Main Law of 1851, which prohibited the manufacture and sale of alcohol in the state.
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Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
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Boston-born scholar and leading American transcendentalist, whose essays, most notably "Self-Reliance," stressed individualism, self-improvement, optimism, and freedom.
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Charles Grandison Finney (1792-1875)
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One of the leading revival preachers during the Second Great Awakening, He presided over mass camp meetings throughout New York state, championing temperance and abolition, and urging women to play a greater role in religious life.
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Stephen C. Foster (1826-1864)
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Popular American folk composer, He, a Pennsylvania-born white, popularized minstrel songs, which fused African rhythms with nostalgic melodies.
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Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)
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Novelist and author of The Scarlet Letter, a tale exploring the psychological effects of sin in seventeenth century Puritan Boston.
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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)
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Harvard Professor of modern languages and popular mid-nineteenth century poet, who won broad acclaim in Europe for his poetry.
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Horace Mann (1796-1859)
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Secretary of the Massachusetts Board of Education and a champion of public education, advocating more and better school houses, longer terms, better pay for teachers, and an expanded curriculum.
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Herman Melville (1819-1891)
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New York author who spent his youth as a whaler on the high seas, an experience which no doubt inspired his epic novel, Moby Dick.
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Lucretia Mott (1793-1880)
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Prominent Quaker and abolitionist, She became a champion for women's rights after she and her fellow female delegates were not seated at the London antislavery convention of 1840. She, along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, held the first Woman's Rights Convention at Seneca Falls in 1848.
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Robert Owen (1801-1877)
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Scottish-born textile manufacturer and founder of New Harmony, a short-lived communal society of about a thousand people in Indiana.
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Francis Parkman (1823-1893)
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Early American historian who wrote a series of volumes on the imperial struggle between Britain and France in North America.
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Edgar Allen Poe (1809-1849)
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American poet and author of Gothic horror short stories, including "The Fall of the House of Usher," which reflected a distinctly morbid sensibility for Jacksonian America.
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Joseph Smith (1805-1844)
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Founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormons),He gained a following after an angel directed him to a set of golden plates which, when deciphered, became the Book of Mormon. His communal, authoritarian church and his advocacy of plural marriage antagonized his neighbors in Ohio, Missouri, and finally Illinois, where he was murdered by a mob in 1844.
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Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902)
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Abolitionist and woman suffragist, She organized the first Woman's Rights Convention near her home in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. After the Civil War, She urged Congress to include women in the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments, despite urgings from Frederick Douglass to let freedmen have their hour. In 1869, she, along with Susan B. Anthony, founded the National Woman Suffrage Association to lobby for a constitutional amendment granting women the vote.
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Lucy Stone (1818-1893)
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Abolitionist and women's rights activist, who kept her maiden name after marriage inspiring other womenβ€” "Lucy Stoners" β€”to follow her example. Though she campaigned to include women in the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments, she did not join Stanton and Anthony in denouncing the amendments when it became clear the changes would not be made. In 1869 she founded the American Woman Suffrage Association, which lobbied for suffrage primarily at the state level.
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Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)
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American transcendentalist and author of Walden: Or Life in the Woods. A committed idealist and abolitionist, he advocated civil disobedience, spending a night in jail for refusing to pay a poll tax to a government that supported slavery.
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Walt Whitman (1819-1892)
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Brooklyn-born poet and author of Leaves of Grass, a collection of poems, written largely in free verse, which exuberantly celebrated America's democratic spirit.
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Brigham Young (1801-1877)
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Second president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, He led his Mormon followers to Salt Lake City, Utah after Joseph Smith's death. Under his discipline and guidance, the Utah settlement prospered, and the church expanded to include over 100,000 members by his death in 1877.